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By 2020, we had successfully transitioned the health care system from one which "fixed people after they were sick" to one of preventative, diagnostic medicine. Treating them for the conditions we know they were likely to develop.


Jim Carroll was the opening keynote speaker for the World Pharma Innovation Congress in London, England, He has been the keynote speaker for a huge range of major health care / health care organizations, including the prestigious World Congress on Healthcare Innovation & Technology • American Medical Group • UBM Canon Medical Devices & Technologies Conference • SSM Healthcare • Physician Hospitals of America • Professional Compounding Association of America • Chronic Disease Fund • International Society of Medical Publication Professionals • Linde Health Care Group Germany • McKesson • Stryker Technologies • Ottawa Heart Institute • American Association of Preferred Provider Organizations • Cigna Insurance • North Carolina Hospital Association • Pfizer • Minnesota HealthCare Association CEO Summit • St. Josephs Health Centres • Johnson & Johnson • Ernst & Young Annual Healthcare Client Conference • Mercy Health • Blue Cross Blue Shield of North Carolina • American Academy of Ophthalmology • American Society for Health Care Risk Management • Association of Organ Procurement Organizations • Axcan Pharma Inc • Blue Cross/Blue Shield National Office • Health Care Industry Distributors Association • National Association of Children's Hospitals • Ontario Hospital Association • PharmaLink Congress • Blue Cross/Blue Shield Florida • Roche Diagnostics • Trillium Health Centre • VHA Georgia • Waters Corporation • MDS Nordion • Providence Health Plans • Harvard Pilgrim Health Care • Canadian Medical Association • Glaxo Wellcome • North Carolina Medical Managers Group • Roche Diagnostics • Essilor Eyecare • Alberta Senior Citizen’s Housing Association


Here’s a quick video clip from a health care keynote in Houston; I’m speaking about bio-connectivity and the trend towards the virtualization of healthcare.

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Here’s a video clip from a recent keynote I did in Houston for a health care group.

It’s pretty self-explanatory, but helps to put into perspective how one aspect of the the future of healthcare is going to unfold, in a bit of a unique way. But it also raises the point as to how trends today are accelerating.

I must say, my presentation and day spent at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center was one of the most exciting experiences in my professional career. And it was all the better with the post event I received from NASA: “”On behalf of the entire Innovative Technology Partnerships Office, thank you for your engaging and thought-provoking presentation at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. From the feedback we have received, the event was a great success. Thank you for sharing your insight and expertise with us!””

 

In September, I was the closing keynote speaker for the American Medical Group Association 2013 Institute for Quality Leadership annual conference in Phoenix. Subsequent to my keynote, I was interviewed and published in the prestigious American Healthcare and Drug Benefits peer-reviewed journal. The article follows below.


At the American Medical Group Association 2013 Institute for Quality Leadership annual conference, a session focused on transforming the US healthcare system was presented by Jim Carroll, author of Ready, Set, Done: How to Innovate When Faster is the New Fast,1 who discussed the ways in which the unprecedented technological changes in medicine can transform the system in a positive way, in a very short time.

“I know you are sick of the Affordable Care Act. But the future of medicine has nothing to do with government—it’s got everything to do with science, demographics, new forms of technological applications, such as genomics, new forms of equipment, and other innovations”…said Jim Carroll.

In a brief discussion after the meeting, Mr Carroll offered some food for thought for those involved in the “business” of medicine. He explained that he tells healthcare experts all across the country, “I know you are sick of the Affordable Care Act. But the future of medicine has nothing to do with government—it’s got everything to do with science, demographics, new forms of technological applications, such as genomics, new forms of equipment, and other innovations.”

Mr Carroll suggested that “by the year 2020, we absolutely can harness these to turn the healthcare system from one in which we wait until patients are sick and then we fix them, to understanding what things are going to go wrong in advance in order to avoid those problems.”

The system that Mr Carroll says is well within reach will have characteristics such as being consumer-driven and retail-oriented for treatment that is not related to critical care, and encompassing many cost-saving technologies.

“One example is in the field of pharmacogenomics, involving pharmaceutical products targeted to particular genes for particular cancer treatments. The cost of sequencing machines has plummeted, and they could become low-cost items. Individuals could buy machines that tell them whether they have certain gene sequences that make them prone to cancer,” he said. Furthermore, “when this type of technology becomes ubiquitous and costs just pennies, it transforms everything in healthcare.”

Smartphone apps are also proliferating and becoming very inexpensive, and are increasingly being applied in medicine. More than 17,000 healthcare software apps are available for smartphones, according to Mr Carroll, and as many as 78% of consumers have expressed interest in such apps. For example, consumers are using medical apps to monitor their glucose levels and better understand their healthcare circumstances and options.

“The patient is changing; the consumer is changing. And we all need to align ourselves to the changes that are occurring.” He also pointed to the virtualization of healthcare, with hospitals extending into the community.

“In the near future, a lot of non–critical care patients will be able to remain in their homes instead of being admitted to the hospital, and doctors will be able to monitor their vital signs remotely, using real-time analytics and location-intelligence technologies,” Mr Carroll predicted. He says that because medical knowledge doubles every 6 years, the pace of understanding new medical information is increasing as a result of the power of technology.

“I tell people in the healthcare system, ‘Don’t fixate on the negatives but on the positives. Think about how it’s good for your patients and their patients to embrace these changes,’ ” said Mr Carroll. “Demographic changes mean healthcare administrators, providers, and patients are becoming more welcoming to technology-driven changes in the sector. And that provides huge opportunities for improvement through innovation.” The future of US medicine, according to Mr Carroll, is bright.

Drug Store News ran a 7 minute interview with me back in August. Here’s the audio: in a nutshell:

Pharmacists are likely to play an even greater role in patients’ health care than they do now, possibly branching into services like shots and checkups, Jim Carroll told DSN. Technology will play a greater role as well, as there is greater connectivity with home medical technology devices and the Internet that changes the relationship between patients, doctors and pharmacists. “I think we’re going to see this fascinatingly strange, very connected world appearing in every aspect of retail, and it’s all driven by mobile devices,” Carroll said.

Last week, I keynoted the Medical Design & Manufacturing Show in Chicago, with a focus on both the future of health care and manufacturing technology.

Scanadu

The Scanadu Scout is a crowdfunded “medical tricorder”, as envisaged in science fiction. The medical device industry will now find that science is becoming truer faster, requiring ever faster change as innovation speeds up!

The folks over at DesignNews and other publications picked up my talk; here’s an article they ran which covered some of my remarks.

The trend toward “bio-connectivity” is gaining momentum, and medical device manufacturers need to be ready to bring that connectivity to next-generation products, a futurist at the Medical Design & Manufacturing Show said this week.

“The number of in-person visits to hospitals is decreasing and the number of bio-connective, virtual visits is increasing,” Jim Carroll, futurist and author, told a gathering of engineers at the show.

Carroll challenged engineers and device manufacturers there to examine those trends and to be ready use them to innovate their products. He cited statistics showing that there are now 17,000 healthcare software apps available for smartphones, and noted that 78 percent of consumers have expressed interest in such apps. Moreover, he predicted that 500 million smartphone users will be employing health and wellness apps in the next few years. ”The patient is changing; the consumer is changing,” he noted. “And we need to align ourselves to the changes that are occurring.”

Today’s doctors are more likely to do patient consultations over Skype, Carroll said, adding that 40 percent of physicians are now willing to track patients via text messaging, email, and Facebook. He cited examples of such companies as Withings Inc., which makes a blood pressure monitor for use with iPhones and iPads, and MedCottage, which sells one bedroom “granny pods” that can be placed in the backyards of families caring for elderly patients. The cottage incorporates cameras and sensors, enabling patients to be monitored and managed from afar.

Carroll also pointed to a growing number of diabetes management technologies that enable patients to monitor themselves at home and share their data with physicians.

Some high-level healthcare executives have gone as far as to say that the need for dedicated central facilities is changing, Carroll said. “One CEO said that the concept of a hospital as a physical place is disappearing,” he told the audience of engineers. “Eventually, it’s going to go virtual.”

Carroll warned engineers not to discount such trends. He described a technical conference a few years ago where manufacturing executives laughed aloud at the prospect of anyone using 3D printers. Now, he said, engineers routinely shop for such systems at technical conferences. ”World class innovators look out at the future and see a trend, not a threat,” he said. “They see an opportunity.”

Last week, I was the keynote speaker for the Medical Device and Manufacturing event in Philadelphia. I’ll be doing two more in the fall — one in Chicago and the other in San Francisco.

I was featured on the main show floor — given there were a number of packaging and other manufacturing going on at the same in the cavernous space that is the Philadelphia Convention Center, we had a pretty varied attendance.

The live text polling results from my audience, after I asked them if they were ready for a "faster future." This is a great way to build an interactive keynote with an audience!

The live text polling results from my audience, after I asked them if they were ready for a “faster future.” This is a great way to build an interactive keynote with an audience!

But I concentrated my message on the rapid changes that are and will occur with the future of medical devices — particularly consumer-Internet-connected devices, the virtualization of the hospital, and what happens when Silicon Valley takes over the pace of medical device R&D.

The Medical Device & Diagnostic Industry publication picked up on my talk with this short article, in particular focusing on the text message poll I ran asking the audience if they felt they were ready for a “fast future.”

Are You Ready for a ‘Fast Future?’ A Snapshot of Audience Reaction at MD&M East

The future belongs to a company that can move fast and adapt quickly to changes.

In 2010, it took Apple 28 days to sell 1-million iPads.

In November 2012, when Apple launched the iPad Mini, the iconic technology company sold three-million fourth-generation iPads and iPad minis in three days.

Global futurist and trend-spotter Jim Carroll shared similar statistics with an audience gathered at the MD&M East Conference and Exposition on Wednesday all in an effort to stress one thing: The future belongs to a company that can move fast and adapt quickly to changes.

A poll at MD&M East gauged how ready audience members feel their companies are to compete in the “fast future.”

To solicit audience input in how ready they were in playing in this so-called fast future, he did a quick poll. Carroll used a texting, Twitter, and cloud-based service to show live results as people entered their reactions. Here’s a snapshot of the results.

It’s interesting that some people in the audience have seemed to already concede the future.

But Carroll reminded audiences that size doesn’t matter when it comes to future success. What matters is the ability to act quickly, make decisions during uncertain times, and remain relentlessly focused on the job at hand.

Carroll said that he has seen many company executives wait to make decisions because the economic recovery was not strong enough or because the uncertainty is too great and the risk too high.

Those companies are guilty of one cardinal sin—“aggressive indecision”—Carroll said, using a term he coined a few years ago.

And that sitting with folded hands awaiting a better time will make them obsolete in the fast future.

Back in April, I was the closing keynote speaker for the annual Delta Dental of Missouri FutureFocus 2013 event.

It’s an event put together for HR executives, benefits managers and other executives responsible for managing their corporate health plans.

Delta Dental has put together a great highlight reel which you can watch here. It’s kind of cool how they weaved my trends issues, and innovation challenges, throughout the video.

I’m on stage in Dallas, as the opening keynote speaker for the Chronic Disease Foundation annual partnership meeting, speaking to the massive transformation that is occurring in the world of healthcare now and into the future.

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Everyone in a leadership position in the health care system worldwide knows that the challenges facing the system are substantial and immense. That’s why innovation has quickly come to be one of the top issues that senior healthcare executives and medical professionals are thinking about.

There is a realization that there is an urgent need to challenge the very philosophies upon which the system is built. The result is that many health care leaders are seeking insight into the major scientific, technological, consumer and social trends that will, by the year 2020, allow for some very dramatic change in the concept of health care delivery. Preventative concepts are part of this big transition.

And that’s why organizations such as the Physicians Hospitals of America Association, CIGNA, the American Association of Preferred Provider Organizations, Blue Cross Blue Shield and many more have had me in recently to open their annual conference or event. I’ve spoken at dozens of health care events for other such groups as the World Congress on Healthcare Innovation & Technology •  Linde Health Care Group Germany • MKesson IdeaShare • Stryker Technologies • Ottawa Heart Institute • North Carolina Hospital Association • Pfizer • Minnesota HealthCare Association CEO Summit .. and dozens more!

Learn more about this keynote topic, “Healthcare 2020: The Transformative Trends That Will REALLY Define Our Future” 

Every industry in the world today finds itself in the midst of dramatic change, as mobile smartphone technology comes to change business models, consumer behaviour, and entire professions.

No where is this more evident today than what is happening in the world of healthcare, wellness and fitness, as a flood of new apps and technologies emerge that will forever change this world.

Back in late September, I was the opening keynote speaker for the 2012 Chronic Disease Fund annual conference in Dallas, Texas. Here’s a video clip in which I’m talking about the significance of the change that is occurring … compelling to watch!

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As for me? I just bought a FitBit this morning — it would be fascinating to see how much territory I cover during one single keynote!

Recently, I’ve had two absolutely fascinating session, each about 2-3 hours in length.

In one case, a major private equity firm engaged me to meet with their main advisory board In another case, I met with a group of very wealthy investors who were / are owners of major family held businesses, with valuations into the hundreds of millions or billions of dollars.

Over the years, I’ve taken on an increasing number of small, intimate events for investor groups that have involved me leading a wide ranging discussion of the investment opportunities I see emerging in the future.

In both cases, these small, intimate meetings (with 20-40 people) were built around a structure in which I would cover a wide variety of future trends where I saw significant opportunity in the future. We then had a wide ranging discussion around these opportunities and a very lively debate.

Both were pretty heavy duty groups, with current and ex-CEO’s, Congressmen, Senators, venture capitalists and angel investors, university professors and researchers. Without getting into a lot of detail, one of the events had me take on four specific issues. These are the key areas that I spoke about:

  • big data: what’s beyond the hype, and what’s real?
  • intellectual property – what’s next as a venture play
  • oil & gas & US energy self-sufficiency: what sideline opportunities are emerging
  • regulatory challenges: as the velocity of change runs up against regulation, who will emerge as unique winners?

In the other case, I defined future opportunities in the context of the vast, transformative trends that are upending industries, providing for massive business model innovation, and for a lot of competitive disruption:

  • pervasive connectivity: massive opportunity as every device is connected, and we have awareness as to its status, location and IP address
  • big, bold movers: the phrase I use for organizations who are in a transformative frame of mind in solving big problems in healthcare, energy and the environment
  • revenue reinventors: how to find the signs of organizations reinventing their revenue stream at a furious pace, which is fundamental to success in todays economy
  • health care reform: what’s really happening, and who’s really innovating far beyond the political bluster. Think bioconnectivity, virtuality, mobility, wireless.
  • the future energy: opportunities beyond shale which involve accelerating science. Cows!

These types of sessions are tremendously invigorating; I really enjoy them, and the feedback in both cases was fabulous.

So there’s another thing that a futurist does that you might have never thought we do.

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